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Plenary 2020

Reflections and Perspectives on Plenary Council 2020

Plenary ‘map’ is well in hand, says President

The Instrumentum Laboris (rough translation: the work tool) is not an indicator of what the conclusions of the Plenary will be.

Philippa Martyr: Facing up to how we got here would help

Knowing the harsh demographic realities facing the Catholic Church in Australia today should force us to look at the past 50 years and weigh up honestly and exactly what we’ve done to cause this. This...

Bishop Randazzo: “Make Plenary 2020 about encountering Christ”

Bishop Anthony Randazzo has expressed his hope that the Plenary Council set to be held in the Catholic Church in Australia in 2020 will “spark the desire for Christ” in people’s hearts, rather than...

Plenary continues despite road bump

The two assemblies will still take place Adelaide and Sydney, with a year's delay due to the pandemic.
Harnessing diametrically opposed views on the Church’s faith will be a significant challenge.

Phillipa Martyr: A catechesis Australia needs

Confusion revealed in Plenary Council listening sessions The Plenary Council has recently started to release some of its preliminary findings from the listening sessions that have taken place across the country. The findings are fascinating. This...

Opening Plenary Council assembly postponed

Plenary Council organisers have postponed its first assembly which had been scheduled for October this year in Adelaide. Plenary Council president Archbishop Timothy Costelloe SDB said that the upheaval caused by the coronavirus pandemic, including...

Peter McGregor: Prayerful and Eucharistic Plenary Council Paper

There is no doubt in my mind that this is the best of the six discernment papers

Plenary 2020: an inclusive Church?

We accept everyone - it sounds so nice. But you can’t be a Christian without repentance and conversion, without the attempt to change your entire life in the light of Jesus and the Gospel...

Plenary 2020: the creeping clericalisation of the laity

The commitment of lay persons is politicised when the laity is absorbed by the exercise of power within the Church.  That happens when the Church is not seen in terms of the mystery of grace that characterises her, but rather in sociological or even political terms.

Fr Josh Miechels: good ideas and a few howlers in Plenary papers

These are the questions all of us - lay, consecrated and clergy - have the task to answer in a life of missionary holiness.