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She-Hulk Review: Weak, woke and whiny

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Mark Ruffalo as Smart Hulk / Bruce Banner and Tatiana Maslany as Jennifer "Jen" Walters/She-Hulk in Marvel Studios' She-Hulk: Attorney at Law, exclusively on Disney+. Photo courtesy of Marvel Studios. © 2022 MARVEL.
Mark Ruffalo as Smart Hulk / Bruce Banner and Tatiana Maslany as Jennifer “Jen” Walters/She-Hulk in Marvel Studios’ She-Hulk: Attorney at Law, exclusively on Disney+. Photo courtesy of Marvel Studios. © 2022 MARVEL.

Looking at the next female superhero to champion a progressive agenda, it is serendipitous for some that the recent series from Disney has their newest heroine’s pronoun right there in the title.

Capitalising on the success of Hulk in recent Avenger/Thor movies, it seems that Marvel has woken the monster within, in every sense of the word, with She-Hulk: Attorney at Law, released on 18 August and now streaming on Disney Plus.

Thirty-something deputy district attorney Jennifer Walters, played by Tatiana Maslany, is an intelligent and ambitious woman.

“It’s painfully clear from the opening few minutes that creator Jessica Gao and her writers are determined on using this series as their soapbox to toxify men and victimise women.”

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While taking a trip with her cousin Bruce Banner (AKA Hulk), played by Mark Ruffalo, the two are involved in a car accident and are both left bleeding.

When Banner’s blood gets into Walter’s wounds, the young lawyer inadvertently receives a Hulk-blood donation.

Banner sets out to help his cousin with her change by teaching her how to control her anger, fear and ultimately master her transformations.

She-Hulk attracted controversy ahead of release for its poor digital effects in trailers. Unfortunately, after the first episode, it seems that the bad production has extended to its dialogue, story and message.

It’s painfully clear from the opening few minutes that creator Jessica Gao and her writers are determined on using this series as their soapbox to toxify men and victimise women.

Walters is running through her first closing argument with a female paralegal friend and a male colleague named Dennis.

“Enraged Marvel fans took to social media over one particular scene which had Walters berating her cousin Banner/Hulk for suggesting ways that she could control her anger and the Hulk inside.”

For no apparent reason, she is told by Dennis that he “feels” like the closing argument will be better coming from him.

He does this while disregarding the paralegal’s opinion and thus solidifying his role as the series’ first two-dimensional toxic male stereo-type.

The episode progresses with a good dose of Disney wokeness and relativism, which ventures into new territory with its use of “he/she/them” pronouns.

Tatiana Maslany as Jennifer "Jen" Walters/She-Hulk in Marvel Studios' She-Hulk: Attorney at Law, exclusively on Disney+. Photo courtesy of Marvel Studios. ©Marvel Studios 2022. All Rights Reserved.
Tatiana Maslany as Jennifer “Jen” Walters/She-Hulk in Marvel Studios’ She-Hulk: Attorney at Law, exclusively on Disney+. Photo courtesy of Marvel Studios. ©Marvel Studios 2022. All Rights Reserved.

In introducing this new character to the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), Gao has used Banner/Hulk to pass the torch just as other original characters have done in previous Marvel series.

Unfortunately, She-Hulk fails to make the smooth transition as it opts for turning Bruce/Hulk into another toxic mansplainer rather than the respected mentor.

Enraged Marvel fans took to social media over one particular scene which had Walters berating her cousin Banner/Hulk for suggesting ways that she could control her anger and the Hulk inside.

“It’s not surprising that a majority of the episode is dedicated to putting Banner down and lifting Walters up to be a smarter, stronger and more composed Hulk.”

“Here’s the thing Bruce, I’m great at controlling my anger. I do it all the time,” Walters says.

“When I’m cat-called in the street. When incompetent men explain my own area of expertise to me. I do it pretty much every day because if I don’t, I will get called emotional or difficult or might just literally get murdered.”

“So I’m an expert at controlling my anger,” she says, getting louder. “Because I do it infinitely more than you!”

Mark Ruffalo as Smart Hulk / Bruce Banner and Tatiana Maslany as Jennifer "Jen" Walters/She-Hulk in Marvel Studios' She-Hulk: Attorney at Law, exclusively on Disney+. Photo courtesy of Marvel Studios. © 2022 MARVEL.
Mark Ruffalo as Smart Hulk / Bruce Banner and Tatiana Maslany as Jennifer “Jen” Walters/She-Hulk in Marvel Studios’ She-Hulk: Attorney at Law, exclusively on Disney+. Photo courtesy of Marvel Studios. © 2022 MARVEL.

For those who know their Marvel history, Banner was abused by his father, witnessed his mother’s murder, attempted suicide on a number of occasions, was stranded on an alien planet for years, watched friends and loved ones die – and all while struggling to control the beast within.

Juxtapose this with what Walters said and you will see her for the two-dimensional self-pitying puppet that Disney has envisioned.

It’s not surprising that a majority of the episode is dedicated to putting Banner down and lifting Walters up to be a smarter, stronger and more composed Hulk.

“Unfortunately, the result is hollow progressive propaganda that strips men of their value and women of their virtues.”

Gao believes that in order to produce a strong independent female lead, she needs to ensure that men are seen as incompetent and irrelevant.

Unfortunately, the result is hollow progressive propaganda that strips men of their value and women of their virtues.

She-Hulk: Attorney at Law is rated M and is streaming on Disney plus with new episodes dropping every Thursday.

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