Notre Dame Australia tops NSW universities in employer satisfaction

Notre Dame Vice Chancellor, Professor Celia Hammond

The University of Notre Dame Australia is celebrating its out-ranking of every university in New South Wales for employer satisfaction with its graduates in a recent survey.

It achieved second place in the country with an employer satisfaction rating of 89.1 percent, placing it well above the national average and a touch behind James Cook University at 91 percent.

The Federal Government’s 2017 Employer Satisfaction Survey (ESS) reported the views of more than 4000 employers who responded to questions about recent university graduate’s technical and generic skills, and work readiness.

Professor Celia Hammond, Notre Dame Vice Chancellor said the results were the result of the university’s distinctive, personal, and practical approach to learning, and confirmed it as a national leader when it comes to preparing graduates for a successful career.

“Notre Dame is committed to providing a personalised university education, in which a broad liberal arts base is coupled with a powerful combination of theoretical knowledge and practical and professional skills,” she said.

“The University is delighted that employers value our graduates so highly, and that their Notre Dame education has prepared them for a successful future both professionally and personally.”
The ESS is the first national survey that directly links the experiences of graduates to the views of their direct supervisors.

It’s undertaken by asking employed graduates who participated in the Graduate Outcomes Survey four months after graduation to provide the contact details of their supervisor for follow up.

The result builds on Notre Dame’s achievements in the Federal Government’s Student Experience Survey published last April. It placed the university first in NSW in five of seven key indicators: overall quality of education experience, teaching quality, skills development, learner engagement and student support.

Notre Dame was founded in 1989 and more than 12,000 students are enrolled across its Fremantle, Sydney and Broome campuses. Its focus is the education and training of young people for entry to the major professions: medicine, law, teaching, nursing, accounting and finance, physiotherapy, counselling, health sciences and the priesthood. It has also assumed a special role in the education of, and service to, the indigenous people of northern Australia.