Hosting a house party

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It is important to consider all the possible risks and put things into place to ensure the safety of not only your guests and your family.
It is important to consider all the possible risks and put things into place to ensure the safety of not only your guests and your family.

With the High School Certificate now done and dusted for 2019 and with the party season drawing near, hosting a party for teenagers is a huge responsibility.

You want guests to have fun, at the same time, it’s your responsibility to provide a safe environment for them.

Things can go wrong. It is important to consider all the possible risks and put things into place to ensure the safety of not only your guests and your family, but also your neighbours and the wider community.

The greater the planning, the more likely it is that things will run smoothly.

It is important that you involve your child in all stages of the planning, as well as the actual hosting of the party.

This not only provides a great opportunity for you to strengthen your relationship with your child, but also helps them be more aware of the time and effort it takes to help ensure the night runs smoothly.

Here’s some tips to keep in mind.

Decide what type of party you are going to host.

Once you are aware of your responsibilities as a host and have discussed these with your child, it is time to decide what type of event it will be. Start by getting your teen to tell you the things they want and negotiate from there.

Plan the party

Once you reach an agreement about the type of party, start planning. Things to consider include:

  • How will information be communicated to invited guests and their parents?
  • How will you supervise? Will you need security?
  • What food will be available?
  • How long will the party run?
  • Will you provide entertainment?
  • What will you do in an emergency?
Gate crashers are now a fact of life at teenage parties, particularly if you are providing or tolerating alcohol.
Gate crashers are now a fact of life at teenage parties, particularly if you are providing or tolerating alcohol.

Running the party – the set-up

  • Lock side fences or gates.
  • Lock areas of the house you don’t want accessed.
  • If you have a pool, check that fencing is locked and secure.
  • Talk to as many neighbors as possible

Running the party – On the night

  • Always have someone on the door that knows many of the invited guests.
  • Make yourself available to any parent who wants to meet you
  • Check toilets regularly
  • Watch for signs of intoxication
  • Be mindful of noise
  • Stick to the planned finish time.

Additional important issues that may need your attention on the night should be thought through carefully and discussed with your teen.

  • Gate crashers are now a fact of life at teenage parties, particularly if you are providing or tolerating alcohol.
  • If you decide on an alcohol-free party, how will you handle guests who turn up with alcohol? How will you handle guests who arrive at the party intoxicated?

There is no handbook on how to be the perfect parent, you can only do the best you can do at the time.

Take every precaution to make the party as safe as possible for all concerned, and you’re all set for a great time.

For more information and resources, head to http://darta.net.au/