Council of Catholic School Parent’s diverse learning resource

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Cheryl Murphy said she found resources for children with a disability were limited and that information to help parents varied greatly from school to school. PHOTO: Shutterstock

One mum’s passion for helping her son with learning disabilities get the best education possible has sparked a new resource to assist parents and carers facing similar challenges.

Cheryl Murphy said that she always knew her son Stephen, who has autism and ADHD, was different to her other children.

Once a kindergarten student limited to saying three-word sentences, the aspiring entrepreneur came first in his Year 12 course in Business Studies at St Mary’s Catholic College, Gateshead, in the Lake Macquarie region.

He is now in his first year of a Business degree at the University of Newcastle.
Along the way, Cheryl, who is the deputy chair of the Council for Catholic School Parents NSW/ACT says the support of many dedicated principals, teachers – including learning support teachers – and health professionals was crucial.

But she found resources for children with a disability were limited. Information to help parents varied greatly from school to school.

“Reflecting over our journey I have often thought, ‘I really wish someone had advised me to talk to the school about what is happening with Stephen’,” she said.

Cheryl and Stephen Murphy Photo: Murphy Family

The online resource entitled Supporting Diverse Learning in Catholic Schools: A Guide By Parents for Parents is the result of Cheryl’s “dream come true”.

“All parents are time-poor, and this gives parents the tools to be the best advocates they can be for their child,” she said.

The new resource was two and a half years in the making, including work with focus groups in schools, writing and a professional review process.

It has been endorsed by diocesan directors of schools, principals, teachers, learning support educators, psychologists, parents and carers.

Published by the CCSP, the easy-to-read resource covers a range of topics for parents of pre-schoolers to Year 12 students with learning needs ranging from the simple to the complex, including tips for:

  • Before and after school routines
  • Communicating with the school
  • Tips for getting organised
  • Preparing for planning meetings at the school
  • Tips for homework, travel to and from school, mobile phone use, excursions and more.

Executive director of CCSP Peter Grace said that while the guide is in line with the statutory requirements of schools, it is equally offered in the Catholic spirit of upholding the dignity of each human person.

“The home-school partnership is really crucial because the personnel in the school are the experts as far as the learning goes, but no one knows the child better than the parent, so it’s about pooling that wisdom and working together in the best interests of the child,” he said.

CCSP Chair Wayne Davie, who worked with Cheryl and the Diocese of Maitland-Newcastle’s Cath Garrett-Jones on the resource, said he knows it can be daunting for parents to navigate school systems especially if they are still coming to terms with a challenging diagnosis.

“It can be not only very overwhelming for the student, but for the parents,” he said.

“This is written by parents for parents, breaking things down into small and manageable parts with the ultimate aim of building partnerships between families and schools,” he said.

“This is written by parents for parents, breaking things down into small and manageable parts with the ultimate aim of building partnerships between families and schools”

“Some parents find it very daunting to try and start to build that relationship, although schools do encourage it.

“Parents know their child best, and this is about getting that knowledge to the teacher that helps them improve their approach.”

Cheryl said she hopes and prays that parents and carers of children with diverse learning needs will find this resource supportive as they navigate the school system and are encouraged to be the best advocate they can be for their child.

“Students with a learning disability have as much right to a quality education as anyone else,” she said.

“I want people to have this so they don’t make the mistakes I did, and so they don’t get disheartened.”

Supporting Diverse Learning in Catholic Schools – NSW/ACT can be found online here

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