Archdiocese launches new marriage resource

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Photo: Shutterstock
Photo: Shutterstock

How would same-sex ‘marriage’ affect you? Is traditional marriage an outdated belief based entirely on religion? Aren’t the kids of same-sex couples doing just fine? What have you got against ‘marriage equality’?

If you’ve ever faced these questions before, whether over dinner with friends or coffee with co-workers, you may recall the anxious feelings that arose as you considered the prospect of a heated and friend-losing exchange ahead.

The temptation in the moment to skim quickly over it or to dismiss it is understandable, but this will be increasingly difficult to maintain as the wider debate continues to escalate.

But we can do something to prepare for these discussions. The more we become familiar with the literature, social science, philosophy, and theology surrounding marriage the easier it will become to discuss in a confident, constructive and fruitful way.

Where can one turn to learn about the marriage issue in greater depth? Where can we discover what the Church had already said about marriage and the family? Or find the studies and social science that backs up the idea that kids do best with their mums and dads?

The Archdiocese of Sydney has just unveiled a new website – marriageinfo.com.au – which contains in one place, hundreds of links to:
• everything the Church has officially said;
• everything Archbishop Anthony Fisher OP has recently written and spoken;
• the best and most influential articles from the social sciences, anthropology, psychology, philosophy and theology;
• the best videos and podcasts that can be watched, downloaded and shared online;
• other organisations, movements, and projects aimed at supporting the traditional understanding of marriage
• ways you can help in the larger marriage cause, both at a local and national level.

On this easy-to-navigate site you can find, read and share the most helpful marriage resources with friends, family and co-workers who may be curious why you believe what you believe.

For as St Peter encourages us, we must always be prepared to give an answer to anyone who calls us to account for the hope that is within us (1 Pet 3:15).

And on this particular issue and at this particular moment, we do well to remember that St Peter finishes with this line: “yet do so with gentleness and reverence”.